Basin-scale seasonal changes in marine free-living bacterioplankton community in the Ofunato Bay

S. Reza, A. Kobiyama, Y. Yamada, Y. Ikeda, D. Ikeda, N. Mizusawa, K. Ikeo, S. Sato, T. Ogata, M. Jimbo, T. Kudo, S. Kaga, S. Watanabe, K. Naiki, Y. Kaga, K. Mineta, V. Bajic, T. Gojobori, S. Watabe
Gene, volume 665, pp. 185-191, (2018)

Basin-scale seasonal changes in marine free-living bacterioplankton community in the Ofunato Bay

Keywords

Free-living bacteria, Ofunato Bay, Seasonal variation, Shotgun metagenomics

Abstract

The Ofunato Bay in the northeastern Pacific Ocean area of Japan possesses the highest biodiversity of marine organisms in the world and has attracted much attention due to its economic and environmental importance. We report here a shotgun metagenomic analysis of the year-round variation in free-living bacterioplankton collected across the entire length of the bay. Phylogenetic differences among spring, summer, autumn and winter bacterioplankton suggested that members of Proteobacteria tended to decrease at high water temperatures and increase at low temperatures. It was revealed that Candidatus Pelagibacter varied seasonally, reaching as much as 60% of all sequences at the genus level in the surface waters during winter. This increase was more evident in the deeper waters, where they reached up to 75%. The relative abundance of Planktomarina also rose during winter and fell during summer. A significant component of the winter bacterioplankton community was Archaea (mainly represented by Nitrosopumilus), as their relative abundance was very low during spring and summer but high during winter. In contrast, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria appeared to be higher in abundance during high-temperature periods. It was also revealed that Bacteroidetes constituted a significant component of the summer bacterioplankton community, being the second largest bacterial phylum detected in the Ofunato Bay. Its members, notably Polaribacter and Flavobacterium, were found to be high in abundance during spring and summer, particularly in the surface waters. Principal component analysis and hierarchal clustering analyses showed that the bacterial communities in the Ofunato Bay changed seasonally, likely caused by the levels of organic matter, which would be deeply mixed with surface runoff in the winter.

Code

DOI: 10.1016/j.gene.2018.04.074

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