• Digital-Health-Conference-2020

Invited SpeakersProfile Details

 Prof. JESPER TEGNÉR
Prof. JESPER TEGNÉR Professor at KAUST since August 2016. Head of the Living Systems Laboratory, affiliated with the programs in Bioscience, Computer Science, Bioengineering, and Statistics at KAUST

Biography

Professor at KAUST since August 2016. Head of the Living Systems Laboratory, affiliated with the programs in Bioscience, Computer Science, Bioengineering, and Statistics at KAUST. He holds three separate undergraduate degrees with majors in MedSchool, Mathematics, and Philosophy respectively. He did two years of postgraduate education in pure and applied mathematics while doing an experimental Ph.D./M.D. degree in Medicine (09/1997). He was a Visiting Scientist as a Wennergren and Alfred P Sloan Fellow (USA, 1998-2001) while holding a position as an Assistant Professor of Computer Science 1998-2002 at Royal Institute of Technology. In 02/2002 he became the first chaired full professor in Computational Biology, in the Division of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology. In 2009 he was appointed as a Director of the Unit for Computational Medicine, and a personal strategic professorship in computational medicine Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital. In 06/2014 he was named Faculty at the Science for Life Laboratory a National Center for Molecular Biosciences, Stockholm.

 

He is an ERC co-investigator (consolidator) on causal discovery and is ranked in an external evaluation as outstanding (highest distinction) at Karolinska Institute. He is the founder of two BioIT companies (one company awarded most promising company of the year), inventor of several patents, and has served as a consultant for startups.  He been awarded distinctions for 


All sessions by Prof. JESPER TEGNÉR

  • Day 3Wednesday, January 22nd
Session 5 : AI & Computational Resources (Chair Dr. Katsuhiko Mineta)
10:05 am

Predictive Modeling and Machine Learning – Disruptive Tools enabling Digital Health ? – Challenges and Opportunities

There is a fair amount of hope, if not hype, to the extent that computational techniques can transform our understanding of biology, early discovery of disease, and augmenting health. This includes improved access to healthcare, tools for supporting a healthy lifestyle, and enabling research tools for the clinician as well as for the fundamental life-scientist.

Using a couple of real-world examples from our work – monitoring the health of an athlete, building web-based research interfaces for clinicians, and predictive analytics from hospital records (in-patient-out-patient data) – I’l discuss challenges and opportunities in this space.

Building 19, Hall 1 10:05 - 10:30 Details